Emily Nagoski and Amelia Nagoski: The cure for burnout (hint: it isn't self-care) | TED

173,841 views

2021-06-14・ 7799    206


Visit http://TED.com to get our entire library of TED Talks, transcripts, translations, personalized talk recommendations and more. You may be experiencing burnout and not even know it, say authors (and sisters) Emily and Amelia Nagoski. In an introspective and deeply relatable conversation, they detail three telltale signs that stress is getting the best of you -- and share actionable ways to feel safe in your own body when you're burning out. (This conversation, hosted by TED curator Cloe Shasha Brooks, is part of TED's "How to Deal with Difficult Feelings" series.) 0:00 Intro 02:12 Three components of burnout 03:35 How to deal with your stress cycle 08:14 How to tell when you’re burning out 12:19 How to talk to your boss about burnout 14:00 The cure for burnout isn’t self-care -- and the first steps towards wellness The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. You're welcome to link to or embed these videos, forward them to others and share these ideas with people you know. Become a TED Member: http://ted.com/membership Follow TED on Twitter: http://twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: http://facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://youtube.com/TED TED's videos may be used for non-commercial purposes under a Creative Commons License, Attribution–Non Commercial–No Derivatives (or the CC BY – NC – ND 4.0 International) and in accordance with our TED Talks Usage Policy (https://www.ted.com/about/our-organization/our-policies-terms/ted-talks-usage-policy). For more information on using TED for commercial purposes (e.g. employee learning, in a film or online course), please submit a Media Request at https://media-requests.ted.com

Instruction

Double-click on the English captions to play the video from there.

00:00
Transcriber:
번역: Gm Choi 검토: JY Kang
[힘든 감정을 다루는 방법]
00:13
[How to Deal with Difficult Feelings]
00:17
Cloe Shasha Brooks: Hello, TED community.
클로이 : 안녕하세요 TED 커뮤니티 여러분.
00:19
You are watching a TED Interview series
여러분은 TED 인터뷰 시리즈
00:22
called "How to Deal with Difficult Feelings."
힘든 감정을 다루는 법을 보고 계십니다.
00:24
I'm your host, Cloe Shasha Brooks, and a curator at TED.
저는 진행자 클로이 샤샤 브룩스이고 TED에서 큐레이터로 활동 중입니다.
00:28
Today, we'll be focusing specifically on burnout,
오늘은 번아웃에 대해 이야기해 보려고 합니다.
00:31
both personal and professional,
개인적 그리고 직장 생활에서요.
00:33
with the help of two experts,
두 분의 전문가를 모셨는데요.
00:34
Dr. Emily Nagoski and Dr. Amelia Nagoski.
에밀리 나고스키 박사와 아멜리아 나고스키 박사입니다.
00:38
They are identical twin sisters
일란성 쌍둥이 자매인 두 분은
00:40
and the coauthors of a book about burnout,
번아웃에 대한 책도 함께 집필하셨는데요.
00:42
for everyone who is overwhelmed and exhausted by all they have to do,
자기 일이 버겁고 일에 지쳐있는 사람들이나
00:46
who is nevertheless worried that they're not doing enough.
자기 일이 만족스럽지 못해 걱정하는 이들을 위한 책입니다.
00:49
Let's dive right in.
자 바로 시작 해 볼까요.
00:50
You coauthored a book called "Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle."
“번아웃: 스트레스 사이클을 푸는 비밀” 이게 공동집필하신 책인데요..
00:55
And the inspiration for this book was actually based on
책을 집필하게 된 동기가
자신의 번아웃 경험 때문이었다고 하셨어요.
00:58
a personal experience that you had with burnout, Amelia.
아멜리아, 어떤 경험이었는지 이야기해 주실 수 있나요,?
01:00
Can you tell us more about that experience?
01:04
Amelia Nagoski: Well, it began with me going to school
아멜리아 : 제가 학교를 다닐 때의 이야기인데요.
01:08
while I was getting my doctorate in musical arts in conducting.
음악 지휘 박사과정을 밟고 있을 때였어요.
01:12
I ended up in the hospital, and I had abdominal pain,
복통 때문에 병원에 실려간 적이 있었죠.
01:15
which they diagnosed as stress induced,
의사가 스트레스가 원인이라면서
01:18
told me to go home and relax.
집에 가서 쉬라고 하더군요.
01:20
And in fact, I had no idea what to do.
근데 사실은 저는 뭘 해야 할지 몰랐어요.
01:22
But luckily, I have a sister who has a PhD in health behavior.
그런데 운좋게도 저는 건강행동학 박사학위가 있는 여동생이 있었어요.
01:26
So when I'm in the hospital, just in pain, laying there,
병원에 아파서 누워 있으면서
01:30
not even really understanding how I got there or why.
여기 어떻게 왔는지, 왜 왔는지 어리둥절해하고 있는데,
01:34
And I honestly didn't even believe
솔직히 잘 이해가 안 됐던 건
01:36
that stress could cause physiological symptoms.
스트레스가 신체 이상 증세를 유발한다는 사실이었어요.
01:41
And Emily said, "How did you not know that?"
에밀리는 제게 그러더군요. “어떻게 그걸 모를 수가 있어?”
01:44
I'm a conductor and a singer.
저는 지휘자이자 가수 입니다.
01:45
I have learned in my musical training to express my feelings with my body,
저는 음악 공부를 하면서 감정을 몸으로 표현하는 법을 배웠어요.
01:51
to use my body as a vehicle for expressing emotion.
제 몸을 도구 삼아서 감정을 표현하는 거죠.
01:55
And it occurred to me
그런데 이런 생각이 들더라구요.
01:57
that if it was true that I didn't just have those feelings onstage --
그럼 혹시 그런 감정들을 무대에서만 느끼는 게 아니라
02:01
I had them all the time, my whole life --
내가 살면서 항상 가지고 있던 게 아닐까.
02:06
and if that was true, wow, that was a lot of feelings.
만약 진짜 그렇다면.. 와! 그 수많은 감정들이라니.
02:11
So I didn't even want to believe this was true.
그래서 저는 이게 진짜라고 믿고 싶지 않았습니다.
02:14
But once Emily brought me a huge stack of peer-reviewed science,
근데 하루는 에밀리가 엄청난 양의 학술 자료를 보여주더라고요.
02:18
I couldn't deny anymore, yes, stress manifests in the body
저는 더 이상 부정할 수가 없었어요. 맞아요, 스트레스는 몸으로 드러납니다.
02:21
and can turn into symptoms of illness.
그리고 병을 일으킬 수도 있죠.
02:24
CSB: So, OK, well, let's start with some definitions.
클로이 : 자 그러면 개념 정의부터 해야겠네요.
02:26
What are the three components of burnout?
번아웃의 세 가지 요소가 무엇이죠?
02:29
Emily Nagoski: So, according to the original technical definition
에밀리 : 원래의 기술적 정의는
02:32
from Herbert Freudenberger in the 1970s,
1970년대에 헐버트 프로이든버거가 정의했는데요.
02:34
burnout, which originally was inclusive only of the workplace
번아웃은 본래 직장에서 일어나는 현상으로 생각되었습니다.
02:38
but has expanded now,
하지만 지금은 그 의미가 확장되었죠.
02:40
involves depersonalization,
먼저 탈인격화 장애를 보이는데
02:42
where you separate yourself emotionally from your work
자신의 업무로부터 스스로를 감정적으로 분리시키는 거예요.
02:45
instead of investing yourself and feeling like it's meaningful;
일에 자신을 투자하고 그게 의미 있다고 느끼는 대신에요.
02:48
decreased sense of accomplishment,
두 번째로 성취감 저하가 있습니다.
02:50
where you just keep working harder and harder for less and less sense
일은 더욱더 열심히 하는데
아무리해도 별로 달라지는 게 없다는 느끼는 거죠.
02:53
that what you are doing is making any difference;
02:56
and emotional exhaustion.
세 번째는 감정 고갈 입니다.
02:58
And while everyone experiences all three of these factors,
사람들은 이 세가지 요소들을 경험한다는 거예요.
03:02
over the 40 years since this original formulation,
그 이론이 정립되고 40년이 지난 후,
03:05
it turns out that, broadly speaking,
대체적으로 밝혀진 사실은
03:07
for men, burnout tends to manifest as depersonalization in particular.
남성들에게는 번아웃이 탈인격화로 나타나는 경향이 있고,
03:13
And for women, burnout tends to manifest as emotional exhaustion.
여성들은 감정 고갈로 나타나기 쉽다는 것입니다.
03:18
So anyone can experience burnout,
누구나 번아웃을 경험할 수 있어요.
03:20
But your specific way of experiencing it is probably going to be different,
하지만 그 구체적인 형태는 사람마다 다를 수 있겠지요.
03:24
depending on who you are.
어떤 성향의 사람이냐에 따라서요.
03:25
AN: And the factors that lead to burnout are not just professional ones.
아멜리아 : 그리고 번아웃의 원인이 꼭 직업과 관련된 것만은 아닙니다.
03:30
They are parenting and social activism
육아나 사회 활동,
03:33
and anything where you need to care and invest,
자신이 신경 쓰고 관여하는 것이 있을 때나
03:37
where there are ongoing demands
뭔가를 요구받는 것이 있는데
03:39
that are unmeetable expectations
그 기대치를 만족시킬 수 없을 때,
03:42
and unceasing demands.
아니면 요구가 끊임없을 때도 그렇죠.
03:43
That is the formula, no matter what context it's in, for burnout.
전후 사정이 어떻든 그런 것들이 번아웃을 일으키는 공식입니다.
03:47
CSB: Your work is around the stress cycle and how we can complete it.
클로이 : 책에서 스트레스 주기와 그 대처 방법을 다루고 있는데요.
03:52
So, will you talk a little bit about that?
그 부분에 대해서 조금만 이야기해주시겠어요?
03:55
EN: Oh, yes! This is my favorite part.
에밀리 : 오 물론이죠! 제가 좋아하는 부분이 있어요.
03:56
So, the main thing people need to begin with
사람들이 우선 꼭 알아두어야 할 것은
04:00
is that there is a difference between your stressors,
스트레스 요소와 스트레스 원인은 다르다는 것입니다.
04:02
the things that cause your stress,
04:04
which is what Amelia was talking about --
아멜리아가 이야기하던 건데요.
04:06
the unmeetable goals and expectations,
충족될 수 없는 목표와 기대치,
04:10
your family issues and money ...
자신의 가정사와 돈 문제,
04:12
Those are your stressors.
이런 것들이 스트레스 요소입니다.
04:14
And then there's your stress,
그러면 스트레스가 발생하죠.
04:16
which is the physiological thing that happens in your body
어떤 위협에 대한 인지 반응으로
04:19
in response to any perceived threat.
여러분의 몸에 나타나는 생리학적 현상이에요.
04:22
And it's largely the same no matter what the threat is.
그건 어떤 위협이냐에 상관 없이 대게 비슷하게 나타납니다.
04:26
And evolutionarily,
그리고 진화학적으로는
04:28
we know the threat response as being the fight, flight, freeze response
우리는 어떤 위협이 있으면 싸움, 도망, 경직 등으로 반응해서
04:33
intended to help us run away from a lion.
사자로부터 도망갈 수 있게 해주죠.
04:36
So when you're being chased by a lion across the savanna of Africa,
만약 아프리카 사바나에서 사자에게 쫓기고 있다면
어떻게 하시겠어요?
04:41
what do you do?
04:43
You run, right?
도망가요 그쵸?
04:45
So you use all this energy that happens in your body,
자기 몸에 생기는 모든 에너지를 사용하는 거에요.
04:48
all this adrenaline and cortisol,
아드레날린이나 코티졸 같은 게 분비되고
04:50
every body system has been activated
모든 몸의 체계가 발동되요
04:53
to help with this escape from the perceived threat --
이 인지된 위협으로부터 도망가기 위해서요.
04:56
your digestion and your immune system and your hormones.
여러분의 소화력, 면역력, 호르몬,
04:59
Everything is focused on this one goal, including your cognition.
모든 게 한 가지 목표에 집중되죠. 인지능력을 포함해서요.
05:04
Your problem-solving is focused just on this one problem,
모든 문제 해결 능력이 그 한 가지에 집중되는 거예요.
05:07
and it will not let go, because your life is at stake.
그리고 우릴 놔주지 않습니다. 왜냐하면 목숨이 걸려 있으니까요.
05:10
But you manage to get back to your village,
그런데 어떻게 살아서 마을로 돌아와요.
05:13
and the lion gives up,
그리고 그 사자는 포기를 하죠.
05:14
and you jump up and down and shout,
그리고 방방 뛰고 소리를 질러요.
05:16
and people come and listen to you tell the story,
사람들은 그 이야기를 듣죠.
05:19
and you hug each other,
그리고 서로 안아줍니다.
05:20
and the sun seems to shine brighter.
해가 더 밝게 빛나 보입니다.
05:22
And that is the complete stress response cycle:
그게 바로 완벽한 스트레스 반응 주기에요.
05:25
it has a beginning, when you perceive the threat;
그 시작은 자신이 위협을 인지할 때입니다.
05:28
a middle, where you do something with your body;
그리고 중간 단계에서는 자신의 몸으로 뭔가를 하죠.
05:32
and an end, where your body receives the signal
그리고 마지막에는 몸이 신호를 받아요.
05:36
that it has escaped from this potential threat,
잠재적 위협으로부터 벗어났다고,
05:39
and your body is now a safe place for you to be.
그리고 몸이 안전한 지역에 있다고요.
05:43
Alas, we live in a world
슬프게도 우리가 사는 세상은
05:44
where the behaviors that deal with our stressors
스트레스 요소를 다루는 행동 양식과
05:47
are no longer the behaviors that deal with the stress in our bodies.
신체의 스트레스를 다루는 행동 양식이 더 이상 같지 않습니다.
05:51
We are almost never chased by lions.
우리는 살면서 사자에게 쫓길 일이 없잖아요.
05:53
Instead, our stressors are "The," capital T, capital F, "Future,"
현재 우리의 스트레스 요소들은 “불확실한 미래“,
05:58
or our children,
우리의 자녀들이나
05:59
or a commute is, like, the classic example.
아니면 출퇴근길 걱정 등이 전형적인 예가 될 수 있겠네요.
06:03
When people have commutes,
사람들은 출퇴근 시간이
06:05
it's one of the most stressful parts of their lives,
인생에서 가장 스트레스 받는 순간 중 하나일 거예요.
06:08
and your body activates
그리고 여러분 몸이 반응하죠.
06:10
the same adrenaline and cortisol and digestion and immune system,
마찬가지로 아드레날린, 코티졸, 소화기관, 면역기관이 반응하고,
06:14
and you finally get home, right?
그리고 마침내 집으로 옵니다. 그쵸?
06:17
You have dealt with your stressor.
여러분의 스트레스 요소를 처리했어요.
06:19
Do you suddenly jump up and down
그렇다고 펄쩍펄쩍 뛴다든지,
06:21
and feel grateful to be alive,
살아서 다행이라고 감사한다든지,
06:23
and the sun seems to shine brighter?
태양이 더 밝아 보이거나 하나요?
06:26
No, because you've dealt with the stressor,
아니죠, 왜냐하면 이미 스트레스 요소를 처리했기 때문이에요.
06:30
but that does not mean that you've dealt with the stress itself.
그게 여러분이 스트레스 그 자체를 없앴다는 말은 아닙니다.
06:34
This is excellent news, because it means that you don't have to wait
이게 정말 좋은 소식인 것이,
왜냐하면 여러분의 스트레스 요소가 사라질 때까지 기다리지 않아도
06:40
for your stressor to be gone before you can begin to feel better,
기분이 나아질 수 있다는 말이거든요.
06:44
because you can deal with the stress while the stressor still exists.
스트레스 요소가 그대로 있어도 스트레스를 없앨 수 있다는 뜻입니다.
06:47
Good thing, because most of our stressors are what are called "chronic stressors,"
다행이죠. 왜냐하면 스트레스 요인 대부분이
만성 스트레스 요인이라고 불리는 것들이거든요.
06:51
that are there day after day, week after week, year after year.
그건 매일, 매주, 매년, 항상 우리 곁에 있어요.
06:55
And I hope people are like, "OK, so how do I complete the stress response cycle?"
저는 사람들이 이러면 좋겠어요.
” 오, 그러니까 스트레스 반응 주기를 어떻게 다루면 된다고요?”
06:59
And we have a list of, like, a dozen concrete, specific, evidence-based ways
간결하고, 구체화된, 입증된 방법들을 통해서
07:05
to help people deal with the stress response cycle.
스트레스 반응 주기를 다룰 수 있습니다.
07:07
But just taking the example of a commute:
출퇴근을 예로 들어볼게요.
07:10
you get out of your car or you get off the bus,
차나 버스에서 내렸어요.
07:14
and your shoulders are trying to be your earrings,
피곤해서 어깨가 뭉칠대로 뭉쳤어요.
07:16
and you're grumpy and cranky
그리고 너무 짜증이 나있죠.
07:18
and still thinking about the jerk who did I don't know what.
그리고 여러분을 힘들게 했던 그 놈을 생각합니다.
07:22
And what you do is jumping jacks in your driveway,
그때 여러분은 뭘 해야 하냐면
도로에서 팔벌려뛰기를 하는 겁니다.
07:29
or you go for a long walk around the block
아니면 근처에서 산책을 하거나,
07:31
or you just tense every muscle in your body,
아니면 아파트 문 앞에 서서 온몸의 근육을 긴장시키는 거예요.
07:34
standing outside your apartment door,
07:36
holding your breath, tense, tense, tense for a slow count of 10.
숨을 참고, 천천히 10초 동안 긴장을 느끼면서요.
07:40
Even just that little bit of using your body
몸을 조금 움직이는 것만으로도
07:43
is what communicates to your body
자신의 몸에게 얘기할 수 있습니다.
07:45
that your body is now a safe place for you to be.
이제 안전지대에 들어 와있다고요.
07:49
You have to separate dealing with the stress
여러분은 스트레스에 대처하는 법과
07:51
from dealing with the thing that caused the stress.
스트레스 요소들을 분리해서 봐야 합니다.
07:54
AN: And this need to deal with the stress
아멜리아: 스트레스 자체를 다루는 것과
07:57
in a separate process from dealing with the things that cause your stress
스트레스 유발 요소를 다루는 것은 별개의 방법으로 다뤄져야 합니다.
08:00
is why the doctor is telling me to relax
그래서 휴식을 취하라는 의사의 말이
08:03
was not going to be an effective means of recovering from burnout.
번아웃에서 회복하는 효과적인 방법이 아니라는 거예요.
08:06
I had to deal with the stress in my body.
저는 제 몸의 스트레스와 마주해야 했어요.
08:09
And if, let's say, you get out of your car,
그리고 예를 들어, 차에서 내려서 팔벌려뛰기 하는 대신 이러는 거예요.
08:12
and instead of doing jumping jacks, you just say,
“그래, 나 이제 긴장을 풀거야. 릴렉스해. 자, 릴렉스하자고!.“
08:14
"OK, I'm going to relax now. Relax now. You, relax!"
08:18
Not effective, right?
아무 효과 없어요 그죠?
08:19
You've relaxed, but you haven't changed your body's physiological state
충분히 진정했어도
신체의 생리학적 상태는 안전한 상태로 바뀌지 않는 거죠.
08:24
into one of safety.
08:26
CSB: Totally.
클로이: 예 맞아요.
08:27
And our first question from the audience.
시청자로부터 첫 질문입니다.
08:29
OK, from Facebook, someone asks,
페이스북으로 들어온 짊문인데요.
08:31
"How do you know whether what you're experiencing is burnout
“내가 번아웃을 겪고 있는 건지 아니면 다른 무엇인지 어떻게 알죠?”
08:34
or something else?”
08:36
EN: Yeah, ask a medical professional for sure.
에일리언: 의사에게 물어보는 게 제일 정확하겠죠.
08:39
And there's a lot of overlap between burnout and lots of other experiences,
번아웃과 그 외의 경험들은 많은 공통 분모가 있어요.
08:46
including depression and anxiety and grief
우울증, 불안, 슬픔 등을 포함해서
08:50
and rage and repressed rage -- we've all got it.
분노하거나 화를 억누르거나 그런 건 누구나 가지고 있죠.
08:55
So our layperson's definition of burnout is, as you said,
비전문가가 말하는 번아웃의 정의는
당신이 말했듯이 ‘압도당하는 기분’입니다.
08:59
that feeling of being overwhelmed
09:01
and exhausted by everything you have to do,
그리고 해야 하는 모든 일에 지쳐버리는 겁니다.
09:03
while still worrying that you're not doing enough.
그러면서도 뭔가 부족하다고 계속 걱정하죠.
09:06
CSB: Mm hmm.
클로이 : 음… 흠.
09:07
EN: If you feel like you are struggling even to get out of bed
에밀리: 만약에 침대에서 일어나는 것조차 힘들다면
09:11
and get the basics done,
일단 기본적인 것부터 해보세요. 번아웃과 관련 없는 것들이요.
09:13
that goes beyond burnout.
09:15
Burnout is where you can show up for work,
번아웃은 당신이 직장에 출근해서는
09:18
but you spend your whole day fantasizing about being at a different job.
어려운 일을 하고 있다고 하루종일 상상하는 데서 일어납니다.
09:23
AN: It's important to know that "burnout" is not a medical diagnosis,
아멜리아: 번아웃은 의학적으로 진단이 내려지는 게 아닙니다.
09:29
it's not a mental illness.
이건 정신 질환이 아니에요.
09:30
It's a condition related to overwhelming stress.
이건 압도적인 스트레스와 관련된 상태입니다.
09:34
So it's not like it puts you in this different state
그래서 번아웃은 여러분을 곤란한 상황으로 몰지는 않습니다.
09:37
where you're going to be trapped,
09:38
and you have to have 13 years of therapy and whatever.
13년 동안 치료를 받아야 한다든지 뭐 그런 상황이요.
09:41
It just means that you need to be completing your stress response cycles.
즉 자신의 스트레스 반응 주기를 스스로 처리해야 한다는 거예요.
09:45
CSB: Work burnout is just such an important thing to talk about,
클로이: 직장 번아웃은 정말 중요하게 논의되어야 하죠.
09:48
I think, for so many,
여러 시청자들을 대신해서
09:49
and I'm curious if we can focus on that for a moment.
그 문제에 잠깐 집중해봤으면 하는데요.
09:52
Like, what are some of the earliest warning signs of professional burnout?
직장 번아웃은 가장 초기단계에 위험 신호가 뭐가 있을까요?
09:55
AN: Let's say there's two kinds of people.
아멜리: 두 부류의 사람들이 있다고 해봅시다.
09:57
There's Emily people,
에밀리 같은 사람들은
09:58
who are aware of what's going on in their bodies at all times.
자기 몸에 어떤 일이 일어나는지 항상 인지하고 있죠.
10:01
And if they have signs of burnout,
그런 사람들은 번아웃 증상이 나타나면
10:03
they notice it just right away because that's how they do.
그 증상을 바로 감지합니다. 왜냐하면 그 사람들은 그러니까요.
10:07
And then there's people like me,
그리고 저 같은 사람들도 있죠.
10:09
who never know what their body is experiencing.
자기 몸에 무슨 일이 일어나는지 전혀 모르는 사람들이요.
10:13
I didn't notice I was burning out until I was literally in the emergency room.
저는 응급실에 실려가기 전까지 제가 번아웃인지 전혀 몰랐어요.
10:18
But one of the things that causes burnout
번아웃을 유발하는 요소 중 하나가
10:20
is our inability to recognize the hard stuff welling up inside us.
우리 몸에 뭔가가 쌓이고 있다는 걸 인지하지 못하는 능력입니다.
10:24
And the solution is to be able to turn toward the difficult feelings
해결책은 그 어려운 감정에 맞서서
10:30
with kindness and compassion and say,
친절과 따뜻함을 가지고 이렇게 말하는 거예요.
10:32
"Oh, I feel stressed. I feel unreasonably angry right now. I'm so cranky.
”오, 나 스트레스 받았어, 이유 없이 화가 나. 정말 짜증나.
10:35
I wonder why that is,"
왜 그런지 모르겠네.”
10:37
and instead of just trying to, like, tell yourself to relax,
그리고 스스로 진정하라고 말하는 대신
10:40
ask that feeling, "Why are you there? What do you need from me?
그 감정에게 물어보세요.
“오 거기 있니? 내가 뭐 해줄 거 없을까?
10:44
What has to change?"
뭐 어떻게 해주면 될까?”
10:45
EN: One of the primary barriers to listening to your body
애밀리: 자기 몸의 신호를 못 느끼는 기본적인 이유 중의 하나는
10:48
is a fear of the uncomfortable feelings that are happening in your body.
몸에서 일어나는 불편한 감정에 대한 공포입니다.
10:52
One of the things I say over and over, we say it over and over in "Burnout,"
번아웃에 대해서 제가 수없이 말하고 우리가 수없이 말하는 것 중 하나는
10:56
is that feelings are tunnels.
감정은 터널이라는 겁니다.
10:57
you have to go through the darkness to get to the light at the end, right?
여러분은 빛을 보기 위해서 어둠을 뚫고 나가야 합니다. 그쵸?
11:01
Feelings are tunnels. Stress is a tunnel.
감정은 터널입니다. 스트레스는 터널이에요.
11:03
You've got to work all the way through it.
여러분은 그것을 뚫고 지나가야 합니다.
스트레스가 나쁘다는 게 아니라
11:05
Not that the stress is bad for you,
스트레스에 갇혀 있는 게 나쁘다는 겁니다.
11:07
it's getting stuck in the middle that is bad for you,
11:09
never having an opportunity to take your body through the cycle.
스트레스 주기를 경험할 기회가 없던 사람들에게요.
11:13
One of the reasons why people don't do that
사람들이 그렇게 안 하는 이유가
11:15
is because they feel afraid
두려움 때문이에요,
11:17
of their uncomfortable internal experiences.
불편한 내적 경험에 대한 두려움이죠.
11:20
When I first started learning this stuff explicitly --
제가 처음 번아웃을 명백히 겪고 있을때
11:22
we grew up in a family where uncomfortable feelings were not allowed,
저희는 불편한 감정이 허용되지 않는 가정에서 자랐고
11:26
and the idea that feelings were tunnels,
감정은 터널이라는 개념도 없었죠.
11:29
I was just like, "I don't think that's true.
저는 그냥 이랬어요.
“그건 사실이 아니야.
11:31
I'm pretty sure that uncomfortable feelings are caves with bats and rats
불편한 감정은 동굴이나 마찬가지야.
박쥐나 쥐, 뱀이 살거나 독이 흐르는 강이 있는 동굴이야.
11:36
and snakes and a river of poison.
11:39
And if I begin to experience my uncomfortable feelings,
내가 만약 불편한 감정을 느끼기 시작하면
11:43
I will be trapped forever in the dark with the rats and the bats."
그 어둠 속에 쥐와 박쥐들과 영원히 갇히게 될 거야.”
11:48
I began a practice of noticing when my body was experiencing a sensation,
저는 제 몸이 어떤 변화를 느낄 때 그걸 감지하는 훈련을 시작했어요.
11:53
allowing it to be and allowing it to move all the way through.
제 몸이 느끼게 내버려두고 온전히 그걸 느끼게 했죠.
11:57
And as I practiced that with gentle emotions,
그리고 부드러운 감정들도 연습했어요.
12:01
I began to be able to practice it with more and more intense emotions,
그리고 점점 격한 감정들로 연습하기 시작했죠.
12:06
both positive and negative, intense emotions.
긍정적이고 부정적인 두 가지의 격한 감정 모두를요.
12:09
So that now when I'm confronted with big, difficult stuff,
그래서 이제는 아주 심각하고 어려운 상황에 직면했을 때
12:13
I trust that my body will go all the way through the feelings
제 몸이 그 힘든 감정들에 순응하게 될 거라고 생각합니다.
12:19
without me being trapped in the dark with predators.
혼자 어둠 속에 갇혀 힘든 시간을 보내지 않고 말이죠.
12:25
AN: And I started doing it 20 years after Emily did, but it's never too late,
아멜리아: 저는 에밀리가 시작하고 20년 뒤에야 그 연습을 시작했어요.
그래도 늦은 때란 없죠.
12:30
you can always recover.
여러분은 언제나 회복할 수 있습니다.
12:31
CSB: Let's bring up another audience question.
클로이: 다른 질문도 들어보죠.
12:36
"How can you talk to your manager or supervisor
“어떻게 하면 직장 상사나 선배에게
12:38
about the fact that you're experiencing burnout and get real support?"
번아웃을 겪고 있다는 걸 말하고 도움을 얻을 수 있을까요?”
12:42
A question from Facebook.
페이스북에 있던 질문입니다.
12:43
EN: If you're in a workplace
에밀리: 만약 당신이 직장에 있다면
12:45
where you don't feel like you can say to your boss,
상사에게 말할 기분이 들진 않죠.
12:48
"My mammalian body is having mammalian needs,
“내 포유류 신체가 포유류의 욕구를 품고 있네.
12:51
and I need to adjust my work situation
내가 직장 분위기를 바꿔서
12:53
to accommodate the fact that I live in a monkey suit,"
내가 원숭이 옷을 입고 산다는 걸 받아들여야 겠어.”
12:58
know that we consult all the time with gigantic corporations
저희는 큰 기업들과 항상 상담을 해주고 있거든요.
13:03
that are making active efforts
그런 기업들은 적극적으로 노려하여
13:05
to incorporate acknowledging people's emotional and physical needs,
직원들에게 육체적, 정신적으로 필요한 것들을 파악하려고 합니다.
13:10
checking in at every meeting, saying, "Where are you at?",
회의 때마다 그날 기분이 어떤지 확인하고
13:14
asking people to become aware of and more clear in expressing
직원들에게 자기 감정이 어떤지 명확하게 표현해달라고 요청하죠.
13:19
how they feel
그리고 관리자들이 알아야 할 정보들을 교육시킵니다.
13:20
and promoting the idea that managers should be ready to cope
13:24
when their supervisee comes in and has a bunch of feelings
부하 직원들이 많은 감정들을 표현하며
13:28
that they need to process and move through.
그것들을 해결하고 이겨내야 한다고 할 때요.
13:30
So it exists. People are working on it. I feel optimistic.
네, 가능합니다. 다들 노력 중이에요. 저는 긍적적으로 봐요.
13:34
And I also know that there's a lot of workplaces
그리고 많은 직장들 가운데에는 틀에 갇혀 있는 곳도 있어요.
13:36
that are trapped in this sort of, like, industrial,
일종의 산업적 아니면 가부장적,
13:40
super patriarchal, rabidly individualistic mindset,
혹은 완전 개인주의적 문화에 갇혀 있는 직장도 많죠.
13:45
where you just need to protect yourself against the toxic culture
그런 독약 같은 기업 문화로부터 여러분 자신을 보호해야 합니다.
13:51
by creating a bubble of love at home,
가정에서는 사랑의 보호막을 키우면서요.
13:54
where everyone in your household cares for your well-being
여러분이 잘 지내는지 가족들이 궁금해하고,
13:57
as much as you care for theirs.
여러분도 그 가족들을 챙기는 그런 가정이요.
14:00
CSB: How can people who feel truly stuck
클로이: 스트레스에 완전히 갇혀 있다고 느끼는 사람들이
14:03
take a first step towards wellness?
나아지려면 뭐부터 하면 좋을까요?
14:05
And how do you define wellness, too?
그리고 나아졌다는 걸 어떻게 정의할 수 있을까요?
14:08
AN: We define wellness as:
아멜리아 : 상황이 개선됐다는 것은
14:09
the freedom to oscillate through all the cycles of being human
인간으로서 생활 주기를 자유롭게 오갈 수 있을 때라고 생각해요.
14:14
from effort to rest, from autonomy to connection ...
일에서 휴식으로, 또는 나만의 시간에서 교류 활동으로요.
14:18
And we always say that the cure for burnout is not self-care,
우리는 늘 번아웃은 스스로 해결할 수 있는 게 아니라고 하죠.
14:22
cannot be self-care.
혼자 스스로 해결할 수 없어요.
14:23
How can you be expected to "self-care" your way out of burnout?
스스로 치유한다고 번아웃이 없어질 수 있을까요?
14:27
You can't.
혼자서는 못 합니다. 필요한 건 사랑의 보호막이에요.
14:28
What you need is a bubble of love around you,
14:30
people who care about your well-being as much as you care about theirs,
주변에서는 여러분에게 관심을 갖고, 여러분도 그만큼 그들을 챙기는 거죠.
14:34
who will turn toward you and say, "You need a break.
그들이 다가와서 이렇게 말하는 거예요.
”너 좀 쉬어야겠다. 내가 도와줄게 , 잠깐 비켜봐.”
14:37
I'm going to help you with this. I'm going to step in in that way,"
아니면 15분 정도 시간을 투자해서 그 순간 기분이 어떤지 얘기를 들어주고
14:40
or even just give you 15 minutes
14:42
for you to yell about whatever the problems you feel at that moment
14:46
and just be on your side and go, "Yeah!
여러분 입장에서 얘기하는 거죠.
“와 진짜? 그런 일이 있었다고? 난 완전히 네 편이야.”
14:49
I can't believe that happened to you! I'm so on your side," for 15 minutes.
단 15분만이라도요.
14:52
Just that can give you enough of a release
그 정도로도 많은 에너지를 얻고
14:56
to feel a little bit better to take one more step.
기분이 엄청 나아져서 한 발짝 나아갈 수 있어요.
14:58
The cure for burnout is not self-care.
번아웃의 해결책은 자기 치유가 아닙니다.
15:01
It is all of us caring for each other.
우리가 서로를 챙겨야 해요.
15:03
We can't do it alone. We need each other.
혼자는 할 수 없어요. 우리는 서로가 필요합니다.
15:05
EN: Making that happen in real life is, of course, easier said than done.
에밀리: 실제로 그렇게 하기란 말처럼 쉽지 않죠.
15:10
And one of the things that is my little reminder to myself
제가 늘 기억해두는 것 중 하나는
15:13
is that when I feel like I need more grit,
끝까지 버텨야겠다는 생각이 들 때가
15:16
what I actually need is more help.
사실 도움이 필요한 순간이라는 거예요.
15:19
And when I look at Amelia's life, and I think,
아멜리아의 인생을 볼 때 이런 생각이 들어요.
“아멜리아는 좀 더 단련이 필요해. 좀 더 인내와 노력이 있어야겠어.”
15:22
"She needs more discipline,
15:23
she needs more perseverance, she needs to work harder,"
15:25
what she actually needs is more kindness.
사실 그녀에게 필요한 건 친절함이죠.
15:28
That's the baseline culture change that’s going to end burnout forever.
그게 번아웃을 영원히 없앨 최소한의 문화적 변화에요.
15:35
AN: And usually the next question people ask us is,
아멜리아: 사람들은 흔히 이런 질문을 하는데요.
15:38
"I don't have anyone like that in my life.
“제 주변엔 그렇게 해줄 사람이 없어요.
15:40
I am the leader, I am the one who's doing all of the things."
제가 상사이고, 혼자 모든 걸 처리하는데요.”
15:43
And the solution for that is probably closer than you think.
그 질문에 대한 답은 생각보다 가까이 있어요.
15:47
I mean, I grew up in a household where feelings were, like, not allowed
저는 감정을 느끼는 게 허락되지 않는 가정에서 자랐죠.
15:51
and we were not close our whole lives.
그리고 저희는 살면서 친하지도 않았어요.
15:52
And then we started reading the research
나중에 관련 연구 결과를 읽어보니
15:54
that said that connection and sharing support was the way out of burnout.
사람간의 교류와 서로 지지해주는 게 번아웃의 해결 방법이라고 하더군요.
15:59
And we started trying,
그래서 우리는 노력하기 시작했어요. 이 30년 간의 어떤 벽을 허물려고요.
16:01
and we, like, broke down this 30-year barrier of, you know,
이 사회의, 가족의 압박 같은 거요. 서로 감정을 느끼지 못하도록 말이죠.
16:06
societal and family pressure not to, like, feel our feelings around each other.
16:11
And it turns out that if you feel like you're isolated,
여러분이 만약 혼자라는 느낌이 들 때,
16:14
there's probably someone on the other side of that wall, it turns out,
그 벽 반대편에는 다른 누군가가 있을 거예요.
16:18
who wants just as much as you to connect with someone else.
여러분만큼이나 누군가와 연결되고 싶어하는 누군가가 있죠.
16:21
And we've been isolated
누구나 혼자일 때가 있어요.
16:23
because we've been told that it's stronger to be independent.
혼자가 더 강한 거라고 한번쯤은 들어봤을 거예요.
16:27
It's not true.
그건 사실이 아닙니다.
16:29
We're going to be healthier and stronger when we work together.
우리는 함께 있을 때 더 건강하고, 더 강합니다.
16:33
There's probably someone already waiting
분명 기다리는 누군가가 있을 거예요.
16:35
who also wants the kind of relationship that you are desiring.
여러분처럼 관계를 원하는 누군가가 있을 겁니다.
16:41
CSB: I think that's just so nice to hear, too, in the pandemic,
클로이 : 특히 이런 코로나 시대에 듣기 좋은 말이네요.
16:44
when we're all feeling so isolated.
정말 혼자가 된 거 같으니까요.
시청자로부터 마지막 질문을 받아볼까요.
16:46
We have one final question we'd like to bring up from the audience,
16:49
that we'll have to keep brief.
짧은 것으로 해야겠네요. 자, 함꼐 보시죠.
16:50
So let's bring that up.
16:52
OK. "What can you do about burnout
“이런 경우의 번아웃은 어떻게 하죠?
16:54
if you are a teacher, where every day is filled with stressors?
스트레스 요소에 매일 둘러쌓인 선생님이라면요?
16:57
AN: I taught school for five years. That's how long I made it.
아멜리아: 저는 학교에 5년 있었는데 그게 제가 할 수 있는 최대였어요.
17:01
I burned out after four years and then I pushed through one more year.
4년 뒤에 번아웃이 왔고, 힘들게 1년을 더 했죠.
17:07
If you have any possible means of reducing the everyday stressors
만약 관리자로서 결정 과정에서 오는 매일의 스트레스 요소를
17:12
by getting involved in administrative decisions,
없앨 수 있는 어떤 방법이라도 있다면
17:14
that's great, but that's almost never the case.
그나마 좋지만, 정답은 아닙니다.
17:16
The thing, number one, is to complete the stress response cycle.
먼저 스트레스 반응 주기를 작성해보세요.
17:19
You can exercise if that works for you.
그게 여러분에게 맞는지 확인할 수 있습니다.
17:22
A good night's sleep will do it.
숙면이 도움이 될 거예요.
17:24
How do I get a good night's sleep when I have to get up at 5am?
새벽 5시에 일어나야 하는데 어떻게 숙면을 취하냐고요?
17:27
You have to go to bed earlier,
그럼 더 일찍 자세요.
그러려면 여러분이 더 일찍 잘 수 있게 가족들의 배려가 필요합니다.
17:29
and that means your whole family has to give you permission
17:31
to go to bed earlier.
여러분의 수면을 신경써줘야 해요. 그들의 수면을 신경쓰는 것처럼요.
17:33
They have to cherish your sleep the way you cherish theirs.
17:35
You can use your imagination
아니면 상상력을 발휘할 수도 있죠.
17:37
and imagine yourself pummeling all of the stressors into the ground.
스트레스 요소들을 주먹으로 땅에 내리꽂는다고 생각해보세요.
17:41
And you recover from that,
그러면 좀 나아질 겁니다.
17:43
because your imagination doesn't know the difference
왜냐하면 상상력은 그 차이를 모르거든요.
17:45
between pummeling the stressors in your imagination
상상으로 스트레스 요소를 내리꽂는지 아니면 실제로 그러는지 몰라요.
17:48
versus pummeling them in real life.
17:49
And you surround yourself with a bubble of love,
그리고 스스로를 사랑의 보호막으로 감싸세요.
여러분에게 이렇게 말해줄 수 있는 사람들로요.
17:52
other teachers who can support you and tell you, "Yes, you deserve care.
“너는 보호받아야 하고, 소중하고, 교육 받은, 대단한 존재란다.
17:55
You are a valuable, educated, wonderful human being.
17:59
You are not just, you know, Darth Vader dealing with these kids.
너는 다쓰베이더 같이 혼자 문제를 해결하는 그런 존재가 아니야.
18:02
You are a valuable person who deserves resources, who deserves care,
너는 필요한 지원과 관심을 받을만한 소중한 사람이야.
18:07
who deserves love, who deserves freedom to oscillate."
사랑 받을 자격이 있고, 기분이 왔다갔다할 자격이 있어.”
18:11
CSB: Thank you both so much for joining us together
클로이: 두분 저희와 함께해주셔서 감사드리고
18:13
and for teaching us about burnout and the stress cycle.
번아웃과 스트레스 주기에 대해 알려주셔서 감사합니다.
18:16
This has been really illuminating. So, thanks for your time.
정말 좋은 시간이었어요. 시간 내주셔서 감사합니다.
18:19
EN: Thank you so much. AN: Thanks.
에밀리 : 정말 고맙습니다. 아멜리아 : 고맙습니다.
About this site

This site was created for the purpose of learning English through video.

Each video can be played with simultaneous captions in English and your native language.

Double-click on the English captions will play the video from there.

If you have any comments or suggestions, please contact us using this contact form.