If you know these 15 Words, your English is AMAZING!

1,661,000 views ・ 2024-05-23

English with Lucy


Please double-click on the English subtitles below to play the video.

00:00
Hello, lovely students, and welcome back to English with Lucy.
0
80
3640
00:03
How would you rate your English vocabulary range on a scale of 1 to 10?
1
3720
5640
00:09
One being, 'I know nearly nothing,' to ten, which is, 'I ate a dictionary for breakfast.'
2
9360
6240
00:15
Well, today, I'm going to help you test your vocabulary knowledge with 15
3
15600
5320
00:20
beautiful words.
4
20920
1160
00:22
We'll start with some fairly common
5
22080
1560
00:23
words, and we'll gradually build up to super-advanced words that even proficient
6
23640
6400
00:30
speakers of English might not know.
7
30040
1680
00:31
What do you think?
8
31720
440
00:32
Are you ready for the challenge?
9
32160
1440
00:33
Mega important!
10
33600
1280
00:34
There's a free PDF that you can download that goes with this video, and in this
11
34880
4120
00:39
PDF, you won't just find the 15 words, we've also added 15 bonus words to really
12
39000
6040
00:45
give your vocabulary a boost.
13
45040
1720
00:46
There's also a link that will take you to
14
46760
1840
00:48
some interactive vocabulary exercises to test you on the 30 words you'll learn in
15
48600
5440
00:54
the PDF.
16
54040
920
00:54
I've also included some top tips to help
17
54960
1880
00:56
you memorise any words that are new for you.
18
56840
2680
00:59
To download this mega PDF and exercise
19
59520
2600
01:02
pack, just click on the link in the description box, or type in the link you
20
62120
2871
01:04
see here, or
21
64991
129
01:05
you can even scan the QR code.
22
65120
2000
01:07
Then just enter your name and your email address.
23
67120
2440
01:09
After that, you'll automatically receive my free weekly PDFs alongside my news,
24
69560
4800
01:14
course offers, and updates.
25
74360
2160
01:16
It's a totally free service, and you can
26
76520
1960
01:18
unsubscribe at any time.
27
78480
1720
01:20
With these words, I will say them once so
28
80200
2720
01:22
you can think about whether you recognise it, and then when I say it the second
29
82920
4600
01:27
time, I'll show it on screen.
30
87520
1920
01:29
Let's get the ball rolling with a
31
89440
1800
01:31
relatively easy word—'reckon.'
32
91240
5520
01:36
'Reckon.'
33
96760
1120
01:37
Does it ring any bells?
34
97880
1840
01:39
Here it is in a complete sentence.
35
99720
2880
01:42
'I reckon it's gonna rain soon.'
36
102600
2320
01:44
Have you got it?
37
104920
720
01:45
'Reckon' is an informal verb that means
38
105640
3360
01:49
'think' or 'believe.'
39
109000
2160
01:51
We use it so often in British English.
40
111160
3040
01:54
'I reckon that I use it around 100 times a day!'
41
114200
3640
01:57
Number 2—'core.'
42
117840
2000
02:02
'Core.'
43
122280
1760
02:04
Notice how I don't pronounce the 'R' in 'core.'
44
124040
3200
02:07
There's no 'R' sound there.
45
127240
1800
02:09
It's just that long vowel sound /ɔː/—'core.'
46
129040
3720
02:12
An example using 'core'—'My dad reading me
47
132760
2960
02:15
a story before bed is one of my core childhood memories.'
48
135720
4520
02:20
'Core' is such a beautifully versatile word.
49
140240
3120
02:23
As a noun, it means the central or middle
50
143360
2800
02:26
part of something, like 'an apple core' or 'the Earth's core.'
51
146160
4480
02:30
When used as an adjective, it usually refers to the central or key part of something.
52
150640
5480
02:36
'A core memory' is a significant memory from your childhood.
53
156120
4400
02:40
It's often something that has a direct impact on your personality.
54
160520
4320
02:44
We also often talk about 'core beliefs' or 'core values.'
55
164840
3560
02:48
Number 3—'deliberate.'
56
168400
2440
02:54
'The teacher made a deliberate mistake to
57
174120
3040
02:57
check if the students were  still paying attention.'
58
177160
3120
03:00
If you've never heard this word before,
59
180280
2200
03:02
can you guess its meaning from the context?
60
182480
3200
03:05
A 'deliberate' action is intentional.
61
185680
3880
03:09
We can also say—'The teacher made a mistake on purpose.'
62
189560
4000
03:13
The opposite of 'deliberate' is 'unintentional' or 'by accident,' British English.
63
193560
6920
03:20
In American English, they also say 'on accident.'
64
200480
3920
03:24
We favour 'by accident' in British English.
65
204400
3040
03:27
Now, 'deliberate' has an /ə/ sound at the end, the schwa, /dɪˈlɪbərət/.
66
207440
6000
03:33
You will also hear it squeezed down to three syllables, /dɪˈlɪb rət/, in fast
67
213440
7480
03:40
spoken English.
68
220920
1040
03:41
Be careful, though!
69
221960
1320
03:43
There is also a verb that is spelled in exactly the same way, but it has a
70
223280
5200
03:48
different meaning and pronunciation.
71
228480
2320
03:50
The verb form is 'to deliberate,'
72
230800
2520
03:53
/dɪˈlɪbəreɪt/, with /eɪ/ at the end.
73
233320
2840
03:56
Words like this are called heteronyms,
74
236160
2360
03:58
and I've included some more examples in the PDF.
75
238520
3440
04:01
Bonus point if you know what /dɪˈlɪbəreɪt/ means.
76
241960
3440
04:05
If you 'deliberate something,' you think
77
245400
2680
04:08
about it very carefully.
78
248080
1880
04:09
For example—'The judges deliberated for
79
249960
2840
04:12
hours before reaching their final decision.'
80
252800
2360
04:15
Time for number 4, 'elsewhere, elsewhere.'
81
255160
5800
04:20
Notice how the main stress is on the second syllable, 'elsewhere.'
82
260960
4480
04:25
Here is the word in context. Any idea what it means?
83
265440
4120
04:29
'The restaurant is fully booked — we'll have to go elsewhere.'
84
269560
4160
04:33
There is actually a bit of a clue in the word itself.
85
273720
3400
04:37
'To go elsewhere' means 'to go somewhere else, elsewhere, somewhere else.'
86
277120
7520
04:44
I think it is a beautiful word, the way 
87
284640
2040
04:46
that 'somewhere else' is  inverted to become 'elsewhere.'
88
286680
4000
04:50
We usually use it after a verb, like we did in the example sentence.
89
290680
4280
04:54
Okay, how are you getting on so far?
90
294960
2200
04:57
Let's do number 5—'grab, grab.'
91
297160
5440
05:02
For example—'Someone just grabbed my bag and ran off with it.'
92
302600
4640
05:07
'Grab' literally means to take hold of something very quickly, often using force.
93
307240
6400
05:13
But we can also use 'grab' as a casual expression, meaning to get something to
94
313640
5280
05:18
eat or drink quickly.
95
318920
1680
05:20
It's a great phrase that we use all the time.
96
320600
2720
05:23
For example—'We've got 30 minutes before the next meeting. Should we go and grab a coffee?'
97
323320
5840
05:29
Obviously, I'm not going to snatch the coffee like that, we're just going to get
98
329160
4200
05:33
it quickly.
99
333360
840
05:34
It implies speed.
100
334200
1560
05:35
Number 6, ready?
101
335760
1560
05:37
I love this vowel sound, 'urge, urge.'
102
337320
6040
05:43
I love this word, but it can be tricky to pronounce because of the long vowel sound
103
343360
4800
05:48
at the beginning, /ɜː/.
104
348160
2040
05:50
Imagine you've just seen something that's
105
350200
1840
05:52
disgusting and say 'ur.'
106
352040
2480
05:54
It's the same sound you find in 'world' and
107
354520
3000
05:57
'work,'—'urge.'
108
357520
2160
05:59
Have you heard this word before?
109
359680
4400
06:04
Okay, let's look at the meaning.
110
364080
1440
06:05
Can you replace 'urge' with a synonym in
111
365520
3920
06:09
this sentence?
112
369440
1400
06:10
'The government urged the public to remain calm.'
113
370840
3920
06:14
It's a pretty formal word; you might have heard it on the news.
114
374760
3800
06:18
Still not sure?
115
378560
1360
06:19
Maybe you can think of another word that
116
379920
1520
06:21
begins with the letters u, r, g, and e. We have 'urgent,' this has the same root or
117
381440
6080
06:27
origin as 'urge.'
118
387520
1800
06:29
It's similar in meaning to 'recommend,' but
119
389320
4160
06:33
it's stronger.
120
393480
1440
06:34
The structure is 'to urge  somebody to do something.'
121
394920
5360
06:40
It's also often used in the passive.
122
400280
2880
06:43
For example—'She was urged to follow
123
403160
3400
06:46
safety procedures at all times.'
124
406560
2560
06:49
Okay, here comes lucky number 7, 'gig.'
125
409120
5000
06:54
'Gig.'
126
414120
1240
06:55
'I've just bought tickets for the Coldplay
127
415360
2520
06:57
gig in September.'
128
417880
1640
07:00
'Gig' is another word for 'concert.'
129
420120
2240
07:02
We normally use it with popular music concerts like pop, rock, or jazz.
130
422360
5720
07:08
We don't normally say a classical music gig.
131
428080
3640
07:11
Here, the word concert would be more appropriate.
132
431720
2920
07:14
Musicians or comedians 'do' or 'play a gig,' but most of us 'go to a gig.'
133
434640
6200
07:20
Sometimes it's used in a slang way to mean a job.
134
440840
3480
07:24
'I've got a gig as a children's party entertainer'—for example.
135
444320
4200
07:28
It's like a one-off.
136
448520
1280
07:29
It can also be used as a verb, and I've
137
449800
2200
07:32
left more information about all of this and all of the other words, plus
138
452000
3880
07:35
more, in the PDF.
139
455880
1320
07:37
The link's in the description.
140
457200
1520
07:38
Okay, we're over halfway through now, and we're moving things up a notch to some
141
458720
4360
07:43
advanced level words.
142
463080
2400
07:45
Number 8, I love how this word
143
465480
2520
07:48
sounds, 'cling.'
144
468000
3680
07:51
'Cling.'
145
471680
840
07:52
Here it is in a sentence.
146
472520
1720
07:54
'He always clings to his girlfriend's arm
147
474240
2880
07:57
when they watch horror films together.'
148
477120
2560
07:59
If you 'cling to or onto something,' you
149
479680
2960
08:02
hold it very tightly, usually because you're afraid.
150
482640
3360
08:06
You probably have some cling film in your kitchen.
151
486000
3680
08:09
It's also known as plastic wrap.
152
489680
1800
08:11
We use it to cover food tightly.
153
491480
2320
08:13
If you describe a person  as 'clingy,' /ˈklɪŋi/ what
154
493800
4440
08:18
are you saying?
155
498240
960
08:19
It's a fairly disapproving adjective,
156
499200
2960
08:22
meaning that a person depends on another person too much and lacks independence.
157
502160
4720
08:26
We often use it to describe children or partners who are perhaps a bit too possessive.
158
506880
5960
08:32
For example—'Sarah is a clingy child —
159
512840
3200
08:36
che never leaves her mother's side.'
160
516040
2040
08:38
Ready for number 9?
161
518080
1200
08:39
We're moving into super advanced
162
519280
1920
08:41
territory now.
163
521200
1600
08:42
'Gabble.'
164
522800
2520
08:45
'Gabble.'
165
525320
880
08:46
'He got nervous in the interview and
166
526200
1880
08:48
started to gabble.'
167
528080
1920
08:50
If you 'gabble,' you speak so quickly that
168
530000
2360
08:52
people find it difficult to understand you.
169
532360
2480
08:54
We often use it with the prepositions 'on'
170
534840
2680
08:57
and 'away.'
171
537520
1200
08:58
What do you tend to 'gabble on about' or
172
538720
1920
09:00
'gabble away about?'
173
540640
1160
09:01
'I have to admit, I tend to gabble on a
174
541800
1800
09:03
bit about Spain…'
175
543600
920
09:04
I'm here right now and I love it.
176
544520
1920
09:06
Number 10.
177
546440
960
09:07
This is a word that I learnt fairly
178
547400
2280
09:09
recently, and now that I know what it means, I see and hear it everywhere.
179
549680
5360
09:15
It's a regular verb, 'gaslight.'
180
555040
5200
09:20
'Gaslight.'
181
560240
1360
09:21
For example —'The boss made a mistake and then gaslighted me into thinking it was
182
561600
5840
09:27
my fault.'
183
567440
880
09:28
'To gaslight' means to manipulate someone's
184
568320
3120
09:31
memory of an event, and this usually involves trying to make somebody believe
185
571440
4680
09:36
things that aren't true in an attempt to control them.
186
576120
3520
09:39
If someone gaslights you, you might start to doubt your memory of an event and
187
579640
4560
09:44
you're probably thinking, where on earth does this come from?
188
584200
2800
09:47
Well, interestingly, this term comes from the 1930's British play called 'Gas Light,' in
189
587000
6400
09:53
which a man manages to convince his wife that she has a mental illness.
190
593400
5040
09:58
Really creepy!
191
598440
960
09:59
Number 11:
192
599400
1120
10:00
We have 'ghost.'
193
600520
4360
10:04
'Ghost.'
194
604880
1320
10:06
Now, I know you're thinking, Lucy, there's no way that ghost is an advanced word.
195
606200
5560
10:11
Well, you're not wrong.
196
611760
1000
10:12
The noun 'ghost' is definitely an
197
612760
1880
10:14
intermediate word, but could you use 'ghost' as a verb?
198
614640
5200
10:19
Here's an example.
199
619840
1440
10:21
'We chatted online for over a year and
200
621280
2440
10:23
then she completely ghosted me.'
201
623720
2040
10:25
If you 'ghost somebody,' you suddenly stop
202
625760
2880
10:28
all communication with  someone without explanation.
203
628640
3480
10:32
You simply, and then I'll go down like
204
632120
3600
10:35
this, disappear!
205
635720
3560
10:39
We often use the term with online
206
639280
1920
10:41
relationships, but you could also be ghosted by a friend or someone you're
207
641200
4600
10:45
dating in person or in real life.
208
645800
2440
10:48
It's quite sad, actually.
209
648240
1760
10:50
Let's move on to number 12, to another word I love saying, 'finicky.'
210
650000
6920
10:56
'Finicky.'
211
656920
1200
10:58
This word has two meanings, so let's hear
212
658120
1800
10:59
it in context.
213
659920
1880
11:01
'I'm a bit finicky when it comes to
214
661800
2000
11:03
coffee so I always buy from the same independent coffee shop.'
215
663800
4280
11:08
Another example, different meaning:
216
668080
2400
11:10
'Can you help me put this shelf together —
217
670480
2200
11:12
it's a bit finicky.'
218
672680
1440
11:14
So, in the first sentence,  'finicky' means 'fussy.'
219
674120
4880
11:19
It's a disapproving adjective which means that you worry too much about certain things.
220
679000
5640
11:24
This worrying can make it difficult for you to be happy or satisfied with something.
221
684640
4600
11:29
In the second sentence, assembling the furniture is 'finicky' because it requires
222
689960
4960
11:34
a lot of attention to detail as there may be lots of small parts.
223
694920
4480
11:39
Okay, we are on the home straight now.
224
699400
2360
11:41
Our final 3 words.
225
701760
2360
11:44
Number 13, 'situationship.'
226
704120
3760
11:47
'Situationship.'
227
707880
1600
11:49
An example—'I'd love to move things on from being in a situationship to actually
228
709480
4920
11:54
being boyfriend and girlfriend.'
229
714400
1640
11:56
Any ideas?
230
716040
1200
11:57
This is a great word to use when you're more than friends with somebody but
231
717240
3480
12:00
you're not officially dating or in a serious relationship.
232
720720
3440
12:04
It's a blend of the word 'situation' and 'relationship,' and it's being used more and
233
724160
4880
12:09
more frequently.
234
729040
1040
12:10
Number 14, 'ableism.'
235
730080
4640
12:14
Do you recognise any parts of this word, 'able-' or '-ism'?
236
734720
5320
12:20
Perhaps you're familiar with the words 'racism,' 'sexism,' and 'feminism.'
237
740040
5920
12:25
Here's the word in context.
238
745960
2040
12:28
'As a wheelchair user, Sally is forced to
239
748000
2520
12:30
face ableism on a daily basis.'
240
750520
2520
12:33
'Ableism' refers to discrimination against
241
753040
3160
12:36
disabled people, and I love this word because it draws attention to
242
756200
4240
12:40
unacceptable attitudes and behaviours 
243
760440
2520
12:42
towards people with mental  and physical disabilities.
244
762960
3560
12:46
Okay, now it's time for our final word of the day and this is a word that I most
245
766520
5720
12:52
definitely relate to, 'nomophobia.'
246
772240
4600
12:56
Perhaps you recognise the last part of
247
776840
2400
12:59
the word, '-phobia.'
248
779240
2080
13:01
Here's the word in context.
249
781320
1760
13:03
'She has a severe case of nomophobia —
250
783080
3240
13:06
she can't go anywhere without her mobile phone.'
251
786320
3080
13:09
So, a 'phobia' is an extreme fear of something, and 'nomophobia' is a fear of not
252
789400
6240
13:15
having your mobile phone, something I can kind of relate to, although I'm trying to
253
795640
4840
13:20
spend more time away from my mobile phone.
254
800480
3400
13:23
Okay, that brings us to the end of
255
803880
2280
13:26
today's lesson.
256
806160
1160
13:27
How many of these wonderful words did you
257
807320
2480
13:29
already know and which one is your favourite?
258
809800
2720
13:32
Let me know in the comments section.
259
812520
1920
13:34
As I said, there are 15 more words in the PDF, and we go into loads more detail, and
260
814440
5640
13:40
you'll also find that link for the interactive exercise pack.
261
820080
3840
13:43
I think you'll really like it.
262
823920
1200
13:45
Just click on the link in the description
263
825120
1520
13:46
box to join the mailing list and get that right away.
264
826640
3160
13:49
If you enjoy learning advanced English with me, I think you will love my
265
829800
3480
13:53
Beautiful British English C1 Programme.
266
833280
2840
13:56
In the C1 Programme, we really dive into nuance.
267
836120
3560
13:59
We differentiate between those little shades of meaning.
268
839680
3000
14:02
We also look at your pronunciation, conversation skills, and of course,
269
842680
4760
14:07
advanced C1 grammar.
270
847440
2000
14:09
If you're interested, visit
271
849440
1640
14:11
englishwithlucy.com.
272
851080
1400
14:12
I will see you soon for another
273
852480
2000
14:14
lesson!
274
854480
14560
14:29
Muah!
275
869040
500
About this website

This site will introduce you to YouTube videos that are useful for learning English. You will see English lessons taught by top-notch teachers from around the world. Double-click on the English subtitles displayed on each video page to play the video from there. The subtitles scroll in sync with the video playback. If you have any comments or requests, please contact us using this contact form.

https://forms.gle/WvT1wiN1qDtmnspy7